Dear Zindagi: Movie Review

Dear Zindagi: Movie Review

By Rajashree Singha

Confident and smart; that is who Kaira (Alia Bhatt) is. When she realizes the mess in her, she confides in Jug aka Dr. Jahengir Khan (Shah Rukh Khan). Dear Zindagi is another tale of a convinced, bold yet sacred vulnerable little girl veiled under it. Kaira is an adroit cinematographer. She is good at what she does, and her approach to life is that of a flower child; she is free spirited. Her distinct gesture and refined way of defining her work pitch perfectly implicates of the bold step Bollywood has taken up with a female protagonist possessing a possession and owning it. Confident and smart; that is who Kaira (Alia Bhatt) is. When she realizes the mess in her, she confides in Jug aka Dr. Jahengir Khan (Shah Rukh Khan). Dear Zindagi is another tale of a convinced, bold yet sacred vulnerable little girl veiled under it.

The film has a consequential message; the dialogues are astute and tacky. In a frivolous society where youths find it arduous to explain it to parents and bourgeois the innumerable relations and analogies they draw out from the very small little fervors, the confident banter of Kaira we see in the beginning of the film counts down to the messed soul she is. The movie revolves around the catastrophe one gets involved in the circle of the enigma life throws upon, and how handling them channels to the person they become. The chilli scene simply vignettes the susceptible being in us; not being able to accept in front of the very person we hold dear and close and ending up calling the chilli pungent. Kaira’s life sketches out the troubles the youths of today’s fleeting urban life have to sustain.

With an endeavor of deranging the chestnut of our subject society, Gauri Shinde comes up with Dear Zindagi. Gauri Shinde, known for her unusual picks of storyline as in her debut English Vinglish, with Dear Zindagi she shoots a female lead, who as every other girl in our country struggles to find her own footsteps in the industry she is working in. Kaira handles small projects as ads and cameo cinematography in movies, but she is not satisfied with that. She wants to shoot a whole film for her own, and when offered an opportunity, is seen entrapped in a sea of emotions questioning herself if she is worth the work or it is just her good looks providing her the need. Kaira sketches the anecdotic fable of a sensitive and accessible girl that we all are; who runs into a psychiatrist to lay her innermost anxieties to rest.

To deal with her instability, she confides in Dr. Jahengir Khan (Shah Rukh Khan), who turns out to be a straight sailer and a wave of charisma. SRK as psychiatrist is caring and loving, giving an ear to Kaira’s bitter abandonment as a child and her never ending issues with careers and relationships. Dear Zindagi brings to us a movie we do not get to watch every day, with a realistic backdrop, powerful message and the most eligible actors, it chiefly brings light to how mental illness should not be considered a shame and rather deal it in the most tender way.